Abbreviations and Acronyms for English Learners

writing to characters    Thanks to Thoughtco.Com again!  Here is a link to a helpful articles explaining abbreviations and acronyms for English Learners:

Abbreviations and Acronyms for ELL

The articles also gives advice on when to use abbreviations and acronyms and when not to, considering audience and intent.  For example, the article states:

For more uncommon acronyms, use the entire name followed by the acronym in parentheses the first time you use the acronym in written communications. For example: The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is responsible for loaning money to nations. As the world experiences more economic difficulties, the role of the IMF is often called into question. 

Enjoy, and thanks for reading!

English, the Word “Stealing” Language

What fun looking at the etymology of English words. I often       have my students eximg_0531plore the origins of interesting words we come across in our studies, and they are amazed to learn how much of our versatile language “borrows” from other languages. It helps them understand spelling and pronunciation in English can be greatly influenced by the origins of the words.

Plus it’s interesting to do so.

Once again, a thanks to Thoughtco.Com. To learn more about English’s interesting word origins, go here: Loan Words in English

Don’t feel bamboozled. It’s just English.

Oh. This post created entirely on my phone as I sip ice tea on the patio before the heat wave hits.

How did I do?

Thanks for reading!

This teacher would like to know: would anyone like periodic tips for using this crazy language, English?

crazy english         Hello, readers.   This educator, me, misses teaching.  I am wondering if any readers here would like some little English tips I’ve picked up through my many years of teaching English, ELL, and reading?  If so, reply here or send me a message! 

I believe it’s important to give back, and this is one way I can do that.  I’ve volunteered in literacy settings by tutoring or other ways since the 1980s, and I miss it.

So this is a personal post: I am wondering if any readers here would like some little English tips I’ve picked up through my many years of teaching English, ELL, and reading?  If so, reply here or send me a message! 

Thanks for reading in this CRAZY ENGLISH language!

Laura Lee

Have to love a “fiercely debated” punctuation mark, the Oxford Comma

set of funny smiley punctuation   The informative and often fun site, ThoughCo.com published an article about the Oxford of serial comma here: ThoughtCo.com Article on the Oxford Comma .

This comma is known as the Oxford Comma, the Harvard Comma, and more commonly, the serial comma.

But what is this hot topic punctuation mark?  As the author Richard Nordquist writes,

The Oxford comma is the comma that precedes the conjunction before the final item in a list of three or more items:

  • This song was composed by Moe, Larry, and Curly.
  • This website is devoted to Moe, Larry, Curly, Shemp, Joe, and Curly Joe.
  • This book is dedicated to my roommates, Beyoncé, and God.

 

I just love those examples!

ThoughtCo.com believes the serial comma should be used unless the style manual a writer is using advises against it.

I have to love a “fiercely debated” punctuation mark! What do you think?  Where do you stand on this hot topic?

Laura Lee